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I got all the Rode VideoMics so you don’t have to


what’s up guys segi here and welcome to another tech gear talk today we’re gonna do a comparison of the entire line of road directional video microphones there are several things you’re going to want to look at when you’re choosing a directional microphone to use with your DSLR or mirrorless camera and I’m gonna help you choose the right one for you and one of the things that I really like about Road asides from the quality of the microphone is that they have a pretty extensive line of video microphones and that makes it easy for buyers to find something that fits within their price range now in addition to this comparison I’m also going to publish a more detailed review of each of these microphones so if you’re interested in getting some more information about a particular one make sure you go ahead and check those out the more detailed videos of each of these microphones are also going to include things like different wind tests and looking at the different features that each mic might have like a high pass filter and different pad levels I’ll put some links in the description to where you can pick up any of these microphones and support my channel for free and then at the same time help me create

more content for you and if you find this video helpful please let me know by giving it a like and then hitting the subscribe and notification buttons for more microphone and tech reviews alright so let’s start out by talking about why you’d want to use an external directional microphone with your DSLR or mirrorless camera since you’re watching this video you may have already decided that you don’t want to use your camera’s built-in microphone for anything other than scratch audio and the way I look at it is when I buy a camera I’m paying for image quality I’m paying for low-light performance for a better sensor for better dynamic range and I’m not really expecting the camera to provide me with professional audio now every one of the microphones that I’m gonna be reviewing today is gonna give you better audio then even my cinema cameras built-in microphone let alone a DSLR or a mirrorless camera built-in microphones on cameras are omnidirectional so they pick up audio from all directions with level of intensity and directional microphones like the ones we’re gonna look at today are gonna pick up audio more from the front then they are from the sides in the back and that’s exactly what we want for each microphone I’m gonna let you listen to sound test and then

compare that to what the built-in microphone on the camera sounds like I’ll also play these sound tests sequentially so that you can get a better comparison of each one of these microphones we’re gonna look at five different directional microphones today and I have a similar video coming out for the stereo video microphones and I want to spend just one minute explaining the difference between directional or mono microphones and the stereo microphones a lot of people think that mono audio is bad and then stereo audio is good and that’s not really the case mono just means that you’re using one microphone element whereas stereo means that you’re using two and with these two reviews I want to show you that it’s not that one is inherently better than the other it’s just that they have different purposes now directional microphones like the video micro the video might go video mic video mic Pro and video mic Pro Plus are designed to pick up sound from the front of the microphone and then at the same time reject or reduce sounds that come from the sides and the back and these microphones are great for dialogue for voice-over applications where you want the microphone to focus on the subject and then at the same time eliminate all the extraneous sounds mono or

directional microphones can also pick up sound at a greater distance again because of their pickup pattern stereo microphones on the other hand are designed to provide a more immersive and wider sound field than directional microphones and these are great for recording live events for shooting outdoors where you actually want to capture a more true reflection of the environment rather than making it sound like everything is coming from one source alright so let’s get started the rode videomicro sells for $59 and is a compact size and lightweight microphone that incorporates a high-quality cardioid condenser microphone capsule essentially it’s a small directional microphone and it’s the only microphone in this group that has a cardioid pickup pattern rather than super car yard meaning it’s a little less directional than the rest and I’ll use these graphics throughout the video to illustrate what these pickup patterns look like so with a cardioid pickup pattern you can see that the video micro is going to focus on audio that is in front of the camera and then help you reduce distracting surrounding sounds and the video micro is powered by your camera’s external mic input and it

doesn’t require a separate battery and you might look at this microphone and say like it’s so small it probably can’t make that big a difference but you’d be so wrong with this first directional microphone I’m gonna explain how I’m doing this test I recorded audio and then played it through a speaker into each one of these microphones and that way I can guarantee that the source is the same I’m placing each microphone about 18 inches away from the camera and then I’m gonna record using this microphone right into the camera and then I’m gonna record the same audio using the cameras built-in microphone so then we are able to compare them alright so let’s start by listening to the rode videomicro today I’m going to be doing some rode and microphone testing and I’m gonna be using the Canon 5d Mark 3 as an example of what recording to a DSLR or mirrorless camera would sound like this isn’t intended to be a scientific experiment but more of a representation of what I experience when I use this microphone in real life my gain on my camera is set to manual and I’m gonna have the audio peak somewhere between

negative 12 and negative 15 DB so that I can keep the noise floor relatively low I’m using a speaker to output the audio instead of speaking into the microphone because I want the output level to remain the same for each take I will start up with the microphone at about 18 inches away from the speaker and I’ll move it farther away later on in the test in post-production I will only normalize the audio to the same level so that the volume of the different clips is the same let’s move on to the rode videomic go now this is a light and compact directional microphone dad delivers clear and crisp audio it’s a super cardioid microphone which means it focuses more directly in front of the mic than the video micro and still reduce other surrounding background noise now like the video micro the videomic go is powered by your camera’s external mic input and the video micro go sells for $99 and so let’s go ahead and listen to the sound test today I’m going to be doing some road and microphone testing and I’m going to be using the Canon 5d Mark 3 as an example of what recording to a DSLR or mirrorless camera would sound like this isn’t intended to be a scientific experiment but more of a representation of

what I experience when I use this microphone in real life my gain on my camera is set to manual and I’m gonna have the audio peak somewhere between negative 12 and negative 15 DB so that I can keep the noise floor relatively low I’m using a speaker to output the audio instead of speaking into the microphone because I want the output level to remain the same for each take I will start out with the microphone at about 18 inches away from the speaker and I’ll move it farther away later on in the test in post-production I will only normalize the audio to the same level so that the volume of the different clips is the same moving up in size we’re gonna go to the rode videomic which is a professional-grade half-inch condenser shotgun like again the videomic employs a super cardioid polar pattern which makes it quite directional and it’s able to isolate the subject in front of the camera from the surrounding noise now the rode videomic is another great option if you’re looking to up your audio game unlike the first two microphones that were powered by the camera the video mic is powered by a 9-volt battery it has some additional features like a high-pass filter which will help prevent low-end noise from things

like air conditioners or traffic you also have a three position input pad that lets you reduce the input level so that you can record very loud sources like live music the rode videomic is definitely bigger than the other two microphones we’ve looked at so we should expect better audio quality it sells for a hundred and forty nine dollars right now so let’s get to the sound test today I’m going to be doing some rode microphone testing and I’m going to be using the Canon 5d Mark 3 as an example of what recording to a DSLR or Neela’s camera would sound like this isn’t intended to be a scientific experiment but more of a representation of what I experience when I use this microphone in real life my gain on my camera is set to manual and I’m gonna have the audio peak somewhere between negative 12 and negative 15 dB so that I can keep the noise floor relatively low I’m using a speaker to output the audio instead of speaking into the microphone because I want the output level to remain the same for each take I will start up with the microphone at

about 18 inches away from the speaker and I’ll move it farther away later on in the test in post-production I will only normalize the audio to the same level so that the volume of the different clips is the same now we’re definitely moving into the more professional level microphones from rode and we’re gonna start with the rode videomic pro so here we have an upgraded half-inch condenser capsule that Road says provides broadcast quality audio the videomic pro has a super cardioid pickup pattern and very low self-noise at just 14 DB again we have a -10 DB pad for those super loud sources and a high-pass filter but we also have a plus 20 DB that allows you to turn down your DSLRs preamp level and reduce the noise floor that’s usually introduced by the camera’s low quality audio circuitry now I know that’s a lot of information for a comparison video but essentially what we’re doing is we’re asking a professional microphone rather than our camera to take the source and make it louder and then of course we should expect better results we’re looking at two hundred and $29 for the rode videomic pro but if it’s in your budget it’s definitely worth the price so let’s have a listen today I’m going to be doing some rode microphone testing and I’m going to be

using the Canon 5d Mark 3 as an example of what recording to a DSLR or mirrorless camera would sound like this isn’t intended to be a scientific experiment but more of a representation of what I experience when I use this microphone in real life my gain on my camera is set to manual and I’m gonna have the audio peak somewhere between negative 12 and negative 15 DB so that I can keep the noise floor relatively low I’m using a speaker to output the audio instead of speaking into the microphone because I want the output level to remain the same for each take I will start out with the microphone at about 18 inches away from the speaker and I’ll move it farther away later on in the test in post-production I will only normalize the audio to the same level so that the volume of the different clips is the same all right so now we’re at the top of the rode videomic line and we’ve got the rode videomic pro plus now this mic builds on all the great qualities of the videomic pro but it adds some really nice functionalities we have a two stage high-pass filter with 75 Hertz for things like traffic and then another option at 150 Hertz and that can be used to block sounds that are outside of the human voice frequency range in case you’re recording in a loud environment like a mall or a conference hall again rode included a zero minus 10 and plus 20 DB and that helps you select the signal strength for your particular

conditions there is a substantially upgraded user interface and a whole host of other excellent features but I’ll leave that to the more detailed review the rode videomic pro plus sells for 299 dollars and it’s an outstanding choice for a professional quality audio so let’s have a listen today I’m going to be doing some rode microphone testing and I’m gonna be using the Canon 5d Mark 3 as an example of what recording to a DSLR or mirrorless camera would sound like this isn’t intended to be a scientific experiment but more of a representation of what I experience when I use this microphone in real life my gain on my camera is set to manual and I’m gonna have the audio peak somewhere between negative 12 and negative 15 DB so that I can keep the noise floor relatively low I’m using a speaker to output the audio instead of speaking into the microphone because I want the output level to remain the same for each take I will start out with the microphone at about 18 inches away from the speaker and I’ll move it farther away later on in the test in post-production I will only normalize the audio to the same level so that the

volume of the different clips is the same alright so that gives you an idea what each of these microphones sounds like when I compare it to the 5d Mark 3 s built-in microphone but now let’s go ahead and compare them to each other today I’m going to be doing some rode microphone testing and I’m gonna be using the Canon 5d Mark 3 as an example of what recording to a DSLR or mirrorless camera would sound like this isn’t intended to be a scientific experiment but more of a representation of what I experience when I use this microphone in real life my gain on my camera is set to manual and I’m gonna have the audio peak somewhere between negative 12 and negative 15 DB so that I can keep the noise floor relatively low I’m using a speaker to output the audio instead of speaking into the microphone because I want the output level to remain the same for each take I will start out with the microphone at about 18 inches away from the speaker and I’ll move it farther away later on in the test in post-production I will only normalize the audio to the same level so that the volume of the different clips is the same at the end I’ll do a

processing to a clip so that you can hear what’s possible with just a little bit of work I’m definitely not an expert in audio production so I’m sure there are some talented audio engineers out there who could do a lot more but I wanted to give you an idea of what can be done to improve a recording using some of the basics one of the biggest advantages of using a microphone with a shock mount is that we’re able to isolate the microphones from the camera and this helps reduce any type of handling noise without this type of isolation even very light handling of the camera will produce some pretty significant sounds I’ll also include some samples where I intentionally introduce some ambient noise using my phone I will start out with the pink noise right next to the source so you can get an idea of what the microphone is picking up next I’ll move the phone to a 90 degree angle which will give you an idea of how much the microphone is rejecting sounds coming from the side the last pink noise test will have the phone behind the microphone so that you can get an idea of how much rejection is happening to sounds coming from the

back if the microphone includes a foam windshield or a dead cat I’ll let you listen to a test where I simulate wind using a fan okay so as you can see there are so many great choices from Road it comes to external directional microphones to use with your DSLR and mirrorless cameras the line of rode video microphone starts at $59 with the video micro and then continues all the way up to the video mic Pro Plus at 299 dollars hopefully I showed you that any of these microphones will provide significantly better audio than your built-in microphone on your camera so if you’re interested in upping your audio game and you should be I put links in the description to where you can pick up all of these microphones now there are always specials and discounts and those links will automatically be updated with the lowest prices I really hope I was able to give you a good comparison of the entire line of directional rode video microphones if I did please let me know by giving this video like tweet it share it and if you haven’t yet hit to subscribe and notification buttons you can always find me on Instagram Twitter and Facebook at tech gear talk good luck and see you soon you

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